Tribpedia: Brian Birdwell

Lt. Col. (Ret.) Brian Birdwell is a native Texan, decorated military veteran and lifelong conservative Republican currently representing Texas Senate District 22.

Brian is a native of Fort Worth and a resident of Granbury. He is a graduate of Lamar University, Command and General Staff College and the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where he earned a Master's of Public ...

Convention of states resolution is on its way to full Texas Senate

Gov. Greg Abbott prepares to deliver his State of the State address, flanked by (l.-r.) Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, state Rep. Senfronia Thompson, D-Houston, state Sens. Donna Campbell, R-San Antonio, and Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, and House Speaker Joe Straus.
Gov. Greg Abbott prepares to deliver his State of the State address, flanked by (l.-r.) Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, state Rep. Senfronia Thompson, D-Houston, state Sens. Donna Campbell, R-San Antonio, and Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, and House Speaker Joe Straus.

The Senate State Affairs Committee addressed one of Gov. Greg Abbott's four emergency items Thursday: passing a resolution showing the state backs an Article V convention. 

Lt. Col. Brian Birdwell shows his cast to Marion Jordan and physical therapist Kristen Dammen at Washington Hospital Center burn unit. Birdwell was badly burned while working at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.
Lt. Col. Brian Birdwell shows his cast to Marion Jordan and physical therapist Kristen Dammen at Washington Hospital Center burn unit. Birdwell was badly burned while working at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.

Senator Brian Birdwell Finally Gets Chance to Thank Man who Helped Him on 9/11

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It’s been nearly 15 years since the lives of Texas state Sen. Brian Birdwell and Rob Maness, candidate for the open U.S. Senate seat in Louisiana, were thrust together for a few chaotic moments outside the Pentagon on 9/11.

Sen. Brian Birdwell, R-Granbury, listens during a debate over Senate Bill 11 on March 18, 2015.
Sen. Brian Birdwell, R-Granbury, listens during a debate over Senate Bill 11 on March 18, 2015.

Hazlewood Conundrum Lingers Into Weekend

Key lawmakers are still far from an agreement on the future of a popular college tuition program for Texas veterans and their children. If nothing is done, some lawmakers say, the program known as Hazlewood could financially cripple the state's universities. 

Texas Railroad Commission lead engineering technician for districts 1 and 2, Michael Polasek, inspects a salt water disposal injection well at a Heckman Water Resources commercial disposal facility on the LAMZA lease near Highway 80, January 22, 2012.
Texas Railroad Commission lead engineering technician for districts 1 and 2, Michael Polasek, inspects a salt water disposal injection well at a Heckman Water Resources commercial disposal facility on the LAMZA lease near Highway 80, January 22, 2012.

The Brief: April 27, 2015

There was more fallout late last week from the Southern Methodist University-led research study that linked wastewater injection wells to a swarm of earthquakes near Reno and Azle in late 2013 and early 2014.

Sen. Joan Huffman R-Houston
Sen. Joan Huffman R-Houston

The Brief: March 18, 2015

A bill allowing the carrying of handguns on college and university campuses wasn't heard on the Senate floor on Tuesday because of a paperwork error. But it is expected to be heard today and will likely pass.

Anti-guns advocates inside Texas Capitol where the Senate Committee on State Affairs is listening to testimony SB 11 & SB 17 both related to handguns on Feb. 12th, 2015
Anti-guns advocates inside Texas Capitol where the Senate Committee on State Affairs is listening to testimony SB 11 & SB 17 both related to handguns on Feb. 12th, 2015

The Brief: March 16, 2015

Legislative activity begins to ramp up in the two chambers this week with speculation rampant that the Senate might take up as early as today legislation that would allow permitted gun owners to carry handguns openly.

Texas Senator Eddie Lucio
Texas Senator Eddie Lucio

Guest Column: Mary and Joseph Were "Undocumented"

As a Christian and a lawmaker, biblical stories form something of a lens through which I try to find focus when making public policy decisions — particularly as anti-immigrant bills have gained a disturbing momentum in Austin over the last few weeks.

Face Time

2010 didn't turn out like it looked a year ago. Unexpected people showed up. The political environment bloomed red instead of blue. The Tea was strong. And big shots turned into paper tigers. Here are some of the political personalities who mattered.

Hosed in Waco

It was a bad Election Night for residents of the largest city in McLennan County. After years of regional dominance, their congressional seat belongs to Bryan, halfway to Houston; their state senate seat is 86 miles away in Granbury; and one of their House seats has moved three counties east, to Centerville.

Can We Talk?

Not to be-Labor the point, but on this Day when we pause to celebrate the men and women of Texas (and elsewhere) who work for a living, we thought we'd show off the sweat and toil of our crack interviewers. Nearly every Trib reporter has sat down with a few of the most interesting and newsworthy Texans over the last few months: current and former elected officials, authors and activists, operatives and candidates, and policy wonks of all types and stripes. Thus far we've conducted 37 so-called "TT Interviews" (a respectful riff on the Rolling Stone Interviews that many of us grew up reading) and presented them as audio, video, a transcript or some combination of the above. This non-narrative form is an effective and compelling way to tell the unfiltered stories of Texas politics, public policy and government; enjoy. And happy holiday.