Jim Malewitz

Jim Malewitz is an investigative reporter Tribune. He previously covered energy and environmental issues. Before arriving in 2013, he covered those issues for Stateline, a nonprofit news service in Washington, D.C. The Michigan native majored in political science at Grinnell College in Iowa and holds a master’s from the University of Iowa. There, he helped launch the nonprofit Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, where he currently serves on the board of directors. Jim also coaches the Texas Tribune Runoffs, which, sources say, is the scrappiest coed newsroom softball team west of the Mississippi.

Recent Contributions

Texas House's chief budget writer: State shouldn't cut border security funding

State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, answers questions regarding a lean Texas budget with an appearance at TTEvents on Feb. 23, 2017
State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, answers questions regarding a lean Texas budget with an appearance at TTEvents on Feb. 23, 2017

The Texas’ House’s chief budget writer said that President Trump’s emergence in Washington shouldn’t give state lawmakers license to slice hefty appropriations for border security — at least not yet. 

 

Texas Republicans pitch new voter ID law

A sign describing Texas' new voter ID law is displayed at Fiesta Mart in Austin on Election Day 2013.
A sign describing Texas' new voter ID law is displayed at Fiesta Mart in Austin on Election Day 2013.

Top Texas Republicans unveiled legislation Tuesday that would overhaul the state’s voter identification rules, an effort to comply with court rulings that have found the current law discriminates against minority groups.

With money tight, Texas budget writers eyeing billions approved by voters for roads

A natural gas drilling boom in the Eagle Ford Shale area in South Texas is straining the area's rural roads as more than 1,000 loaded trucks are needed to bring a single well into production.
A natural gas drilling boom in the Eagle Ford Shale area in South Texas is straining the area's rural roads as more than 1,000 loaded trucks are needed to bring a single well into production.

More than a year after Texas voters approved routing billions in state sales taxes to roads and bridges, some lawmakers are questioning whether the first payment of $5 billion should move forward as planned.

Supreme Court rejects Texas voter ID appeal — for now

A sign describing Texas' new voter ID law is displayed at Fiesta Mart in Austin on Election Day 2013.
A sign describing Texas' new voter ID law is displayed at Fiesta Mart in Austin on Election Day 2013.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up Texas’ effort salvage its strict voter identification law, handing at least a temporary victory to civil rights advocates who have successfully argued that the law discriminates against minorities.

In West Texas, abandoned well sinks land, sucks tax dollars

The land is sinking three-fourths of an inch every month around this abandoned well outside of Imperial in Pecos County, and huge cracks have opened in the area. The Texas Department of Transportation paid most of the $315,000 bill to plug the well in 2009 and has spent at least $1 million fixing a nearby farm-to-market road.
The land is sinking three-fourths of an inch every month around this abandoned well outside of Imperial in Pecos County, and huge cracks have opened in the area. The Texas Department of Transportation paid most of the $315,000 bill to plug the well in 2009 and has spent at least $1 million fixing a nearby farm-to-market road.

Land around a West Texas roadway used to be flat. Now, it’s fissured, sinking and has cost taxpayers more than a million dollars — all because of a water well that was left unplugged.