House Appropriations Chairman John Zerwas, R-Richmond, and Senate Finance Chairwoman Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound.
<p>House Appropriations Chairman John Zerwas, R-Richmond, and Senate Finance Chairwoman Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound.</p>

Analysis: A high-stakes budget duel — if Texas lawmakers want one

The Senate doesn't like the House's hit on the Rainy Day Fund. The House doesn't like the Senate's delay of a deposit into the state's highway fund. Neither wants to raise taxes. But all is not yet lost — unless they want to fight about it.

 
Texas A&M Kingsville Army ROTC cadets  (l-r) Andrew Wilson, Nathaniel Estes, Octavio Calleja-Ponce, Daniel Obrego and Cristian Barriosalas raise the flag in front of Texas A&M Kingsville's College Hall on October 26, 2016.
Texas A&M Kingsville Army ROTC cadets (l-r) Andrew Wilson, Nathaniel Estes, Octavio Calleja-Ponce, Daniel Obrego and Cristian Barriosalas raise the flag in front of Texas A&M Kingsville's College Hall on October 26, 2016.

Legislative attempts to overhaul Hazlewood veterans tuition program are losing steam

A change of heart by a powerful lawmaker and vocal opposition by veterans groups have imperiled hopes for a major overhaul of Texas' free tuition program for veterans and their kids. 

Legislative attempts to overhaul Hazlewood veterans tuition program are losing steam

Texas A&M Kingsville Army ROTC cadets  (l-r) Andrew Wilson, Nathaniel Estes, Octavio Calleja-Ponce, Daniel Obrego and Cristian Barriosalas raise the flag in front of Texas A&M Kingsville's College Hall on October 26, 2016.
Texas A&M Kingsville Army ROTC cadets (l-r) Andrew Wilson, Nathaniel Estes, Octavio Calleja-Ponce, Daniel Obrego and Cristian Barriosalas raise the flag in front of Texas A&M Kingsville's College Hall on October 26, 2016.

A change of heart by a powerful lawmaker and vocal opposition by veterans groups have imperiled hopes for a major overhaul of Texas' free tuition program for veterans and their kids. 

 

Ahead of 2018, trial likely looms in Texas political map battle

Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;
<p>Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;</p>

“I think the trial is certain,” said Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, a lead plaintiff in the years-long challenge of the state’s political boundaries.

What unusual maneuver happened in the Texas House to halt amendments on “sanctuary” bill?

State Rep. Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton, left, talks with Rep. John Cyrier, R-Lockhart,&nbsp;on the House floor on April 27, 2017.
<p><span>State Rep. Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton, left, talks with Rep. John Cyrier, R-<span>Lockhart,</span>&nbsp;on the House floor on April 27, 2017.</span></p>

The marathon debate on the “sanctuary” bill in the Texas House had impassioned speeches, tears and what some House Democrats called a surprising move by a House Republican to cut short debate on adding amendments to the bill.

The Brief: The "sanctuary" bill is closer to Abbott's desk

Rep. Rafael Anchia, D-Dallas, speaks to Rep. Victoria Neave, D-Dallas, at the back mic in the Texas House during the debate on a bill that would ban "sanctuary" policies in Texas.
<p>Rep. Rafael Anchia, D-Dallas, speaks to Rep. Victoria Neave, D-Dallas, at the back mic in the Texas House during the debate on a bill that would ban "sanctuary" policies in Texas.</p>

After a marathon debate that went into the early hours of the morning on a bill that would ban “sanctuary” policies in Texas, the Texas House officially approved the measure along a party-line vote Thursday afternoon.

The Brief: While you slept, the Texas House tentatively passed a sanctuary cities ban

State Rep. Veronica Neave, D-Dallas, gives an emotional speech as a picture of her father is held up during the debate on SB4 &mdash; the "sanctuary cities" bill &mdash; on April 26, 2017. &nbsp;
<p>State Rep. Veronica Neave, D-Dallas, gives an emotional speech as a picture of her father is held up during the debate on SB4 &mdash; the "sanctuary cities" bill &mdash; on April 26, 2017. &nbsp;</p>

After more than 16 hours of emotional debate — which left some lawmakers in tears — the Texas House tentatively passed a controversial bill that would ban "sanctuary" policies in Texas.