This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison.  
<p><span>This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison. &nbsp;</span></p>

Liquor regulators acknowledge Rangers haven't cleared them

Texas liquor regulators claimed this week that an investigative report about its sale of alcohol at a state convention  had been turned over to the Texas Rangers. That story fell apart Friday, a day after the Texas Tribune reported on TABC lavish spending practices at out of state conventions.

 
 

Liquor regulators partying on taxpayers' tab

This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison. &nbsp;
<p><span>This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison. &nbsp;</span></p>

Texas alcohol regulators know how to party: records show they've spent tens of thousands of dollars to travel to swanky resorts where liquor flows and industry lobbyists abound.

Prayer rooms are just one way Texas public schools accommodate religious freedom

Classrooms or other areas designated for prayer are not that unusual in public schools. Legally, schools can make accommodations for students who want to practice their faith.&nbsp;
<p><span>Classrooms or other areas designated for prayer are not that unusual in public schools. Legally, schools can make accommodations for students who want to practice their faith.&nbsp;</span></p>

The Frisco Independent School District has said it didn’t violate any state or federal laws by having a prayer room and that the room is open to students of all faiths.  

Instead of a border wall, some Texans want parks, solar panels or levees

A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office.
A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office.

As the Trump Administration moves ahead with its plans for a barrier just north of the Rio Grande, Texans are weighing in on how the president should approach the project. And the ideas range from the comical to the practical.